Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Things To Do When It's 100 Degrees...

... Sit in the house and drink Sangria.

My lazy version of sangria is to stick popsicles in cheap wine.  I use the good popsicles, though.  The ones made with real fruit.

See?  Fruit!  It's healthy.


Surprisingly, the horses don't seem to be too bothered by the heat.  They have plenty of shade and water, though.

Jack has discovered a novel way to keep cool.  He lays in the mud.  Unfortunately, the biggest and best mud puddle is the one that surrounds the water tubs.  His wallowing has resulted in dumped water tubs on more than one occasion.

Of course, dumped water tubs mean more mud.  Maybe he's smarter than I give him credit for.


While I admire his innovation, getting all the dried mud off of him is really a chore.  Between his stereotypically Thoroughbred thin skin and his stereotypically 3 yr old wiggliness, cleaning him up  to work is more work than working him.

As for work, we're keeping it light.  Spider and I working on polishing our walk work.  I've always been told that walk is the hardest gait.  I can believe that, it's certainly the easiest gait to screw up.  The walk is the only gait that lacks a moment of suspension, which makes it difficult to correct.  You can hide a lot in a moment of suspension.  If a horse gets jiggy in the trot, you can kick him in that moment of suspension and get him moving again.  If he gets lateral in the canter, same thing.  If he gets too strong, you've at least got some impulsion to work with.  But, the walk is a marching, four beat gait that puts all your tension, all your stiffness and all your other faults out there for display.  Performing the walk part of tests always makes me feel naked.  Hopefully, all the work we're doing will help with that, or at least make me more comfortable in my nakedness.

Jack is being introduced to the long lines.  While long-lining can be quite physically demanding, it doesn't require much energy in the introductory phases.  What Jack is learning now is to get used to the feel of the lines on his sides and legs, to not try to turn and face me when I move around him with the lines and to stop and go on command (a concept he's spotty on under saddle, too).  It's good work for the heat.


13 comments:

  1. omg your homemade sangria is amazing!!! smart smart idea!

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    Replies
    1. Pro Tip: Break the popsicles up a little before taking them out of the package. They fit in the glass better that way!

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    2. Bahahahaha noted thanks :)

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  2. Omg the sangria!! You win my favorite blogger for the day.

    Have you considered taking your idea to pinterest? You could be famous.

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    Replies
    1. I don't Pinterest. I have enough distractions. Feel free to post it for me.

      Delete
  3. Haha, I second both the other comments! That's my kind of idea :)

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    Replies
    1. Haha! Who knew my claim to fame would be popsicles in wine?

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    2. Well, we knew it was going to be wine and something. The popsicles are a surprise for sure. ;)

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  4. Replies
    1. Thank you, thank you! I'm the Baucher of Booze!

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  5. Sangria is awesome, and now having read this, I want some, alas it's time for me to go to bed :-) Hope this humidity subsides soon, super miserable!

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  6. Had some commercially made Sangria tonight in your honor. *G*

    Love Jack's cooling off technique--with the added benefit that the mud helps protect him from flies--works for elephants. Nothing like a young, creative horse to keep you on your toes.

    You are more intrepid than I, riding in this weather. Then again, I am older...good excuse.

    Getting a good walk can help improve everything. If you can get your horse honest and correct in a gait with minimal impulsion, then it's all so much better when you go to an impulsed gait.

    As for the longlining! Yes! Best kind of training for a young horse that needs to learn to steer, stop and do all those wonderful things. With no rider and no worry of balancing that extra weight on his back, Jack can concentrate on learning the basics. It will make him so much more rideable.

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